Guest Post: Author K.V. Flynn discusses “adults” reading “kidlit” and new release, On the Move

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

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THANKS, Jessi and L.A. for inviting me to hang in The Book Cove today. Very cool. Appreciate the chance to write a guest post on your site. What I like around here are the blogs and reviews of writers writing and doing what they love to write and do. That works for life same as art, no? Whatever your thing is. And around here you have a lot of love for NA and YA books.

So I thought I’d write a little about how “adults” reading “kidlit” is somehow now a thing. Lots of bloggers and trad-media-types speculate as to why so-called grown-ups (or anybody older than thirteen, basically) is all over some of the big books of the last few years that feature teen protagonists: The Hunger Games, The Harry Potters, The Maze Runners, the Divergent et al. Or why mags that no Millennial ever reads, like TIME, continue to proclaim the “golden age of young-adult literature” and generate their top-100 lists of YA fiction, new and old, featuring books that we already know are great.

I mean, is there really an issue around who is reading any good book, regardless their age? Or, who wouldn’t think that A Wrinkle in Time or The Outsiders was going to stay on your “love it” book list, whether you’re nineteen or forty-nine? But okay, let’s say that for whatever reason—the internet, the movies, the helicopter engagement of parents reading these books to their kids and falling for them, themselves—there is a cultural shift in the fascination with and commercial popularity of YA novels for all ages right now, a “golden-age” as they said. What then?

On The Move by K.V. Flynn
www.thebookcove.com
As anybody knows who checks me out, or who has peeked at my new book On the Move, I skate. I’m not eleven, although I did skate when I was eleven and I’m still friends with some of the guys I hung with at my local skatepark back then. Like the boys in my novels, I connected with certain great buddies and had some mad fun adventures in and around the Southern California skate culture. Then like now it was something I loved doing—skating still involves being outside, hanging with people I enjoy, and challenging myself to skills and activities that (sometimes) even make me stronger or healthier. (Sometimes I crash and burn—that, however, is another story altogether!)

Same with the guys I play music with. I have teachers and band mates and former frat brothers who all like to jam—some professionals, some who play in top groups or others who keep performances to just around the basement. It’s the same notes, the same horn, the same axe as I picked up when I was eight, fourteen, twenty-two-years-old so why wouldn’t I keep going back to how I feel and what I do and how great it is to be in the hang with my buddies doing something awesome? Nobody said my trumpet permit expired when I graduated high school jazz band, right?

Same with YA books. The good ones have always been forever. Maybe there are just more good ones now.

For most readers and writers of YA books, there are a set of big feelings that connect to reading our favorites, whether the first time we “meet” a certain book was as a tween or much later. We always remember the first time we read the powerful, funny, teary, romantic, eye-opening books like The Book Thief or Charlotte’s Web or The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. Yeah, not every YA/MG book you read rocks your world but the best of them, the ones that stay with you, open your eyes and your heart… even Captain Underpants! What’s better than to just crack up sometimes, right?

So, to me, like to Meg Wolitzer who tapped in to the powerful emotional memory of her first reading of The Bell Jar as a teen in order to tackle her writing of Belzhar decades later, there is all of this “leftover feeling” from our encounters with YA lit, at whatever age we read it. And like picking your pleasure reading or playing music or skating or writing or whatever you do as you “grow up” and define yourself as an adult of tastes and desires and experiences and activities, you’re going to tap back in to that feeling, seek it out, rock it as many ways as you can, alone or in groups, in work or at play. How lucky are we, that just curling up with a new YA novel or an old favorite on a crappy afternoon in a comfortable chair can touch us back and raise us up through the affecting, transforming, intense and universal feelings that they bring to us all?

Read well. Skate on.

And if you haven’t already, please check out On the Move, a new YA/older-MG novel set in Southern California about a 14-year-old skater named Callum Vicente. He and his middle school skateboard buddies are spending the best summer together ever, grinding and doing tricks all day at a mountain-top skate camp called PEAK. But when a major war breaks out, they’re stranded—separated from their parents, cut off from communications, and almost alone in an evacuated state. They use their wits and resources, along with a secret network of skate parks and message boards, to travel miles to the north and reach their families in the Safe Camps—skating all the way!

It’s full of skating, yes, and multi-cultural kids who pick up on a cool underground network of retro tech, green living, secret clues, and skater support like no other you’ve read about before. It has some scary stuff, and definitely shows how easy it can be to let aggression and tempers get out of hand, leading to the devastation and destruction that we see in On the Move. But it has a hopeful message: kids are great, smart, resourceful, thoughtful, funny, loyal, compassionate, energetic. They know how to do the right thing, and will stand by their friends no matter what.

Where can you find On the Move? Here’s a few ideas!


Amazon: http://goo.gl/W0A2Zg
Amazon UK: http://goo.gl/TTJ7Pu
Amazon Australia: http://goo.gl/stT9QR
Barnes & Noble: http://goo.gl/KuY8EI
iTunes: http://goo.gl/nt6U03
Smashwords: http://goo.gl/WM0s59
Kobo: http://goo.gl/45hFgD


And to find me, if you’re a fan of indie writing or skating, I post about that on Facebook: 

www.facebook.com/OnTheMoveBooks
Twitter: @OnTheMoveBooks
Tumblr: onthemovebooks.tumblr.com
Goodreads:. www.goodreads.com/author/show/8420774.K_V_Flynn




Watch for the next book in my trilogy, On the Rim, in 2015!

Blog Talk: My favorite book blogging communities

Monday, January 26, 2015

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Previously I posted on how to have a successful first year blogging. My biggest tie-together point was that it is absolutely necessary to have community involvement if you want readers and other bloggers to know that you exist. I included many of the social media sites that I’m involved with that have helped to connect my blog with others. But when it comes to community engagement, I don’t consider Facebook and Twitter on the top of the list. Mostly because of all of the other posts they get covered up in on newsfeeds and the wonky visibility ratings that these sites casually roll out with every month. Compiled here are a couple of the sites that I go to whenever I am on my blog. These are sites that have a variety of discussion posts, blogging and writing tips, and a general friendly environment. If you’ve been around the book blog/writing world for a while you’ve probably heard of these. If you have others to suggest, please leave links in the comments!

A penny for your thoughts #5 (quote from Coraline by Neil Gaiman)

Sunday, January 25, 2015

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Words touch us all in different ways. Sometimes the original intent of a quote resonates so profoundly with us that it is hard to believe that another wrote it. Other times it is a single word, peculiar phrasing, or an alternative meaning regarding an event in our lives that resonates the most. I believe in the power of starting the day (and week) off with a positive thought -- and so was created A Penny For Your Thoughts. This is a weekly blog hop that will feature quotes of all kinds; classics, character, book-movie, personal, etc. The themes will range from funny to serious, but really it all depends on how you interpret it! How does this work?


  1. Every Sunday a quote will be posted
  2. Post your thoughts on your blog and/or the comment section of a participating blog. You only get the penny for one or the other. You can do both but it doesn't count twice.
  3. Those with posts can join up on the Linky - Linky will not be active until day of post
  4. Collect the pennies! Every week there will be a new penny to collect and include with your post.
  5. RAFFLE ENTRY: Your site or comment needs to be submitted to this form as well so that your name can be uploaded to a raffle generator. If you're using a comment as a submission instead of a post, then put name of site where you left the comment in the "direct link" section.
  6. On the last Saturday of every month the entries from the form above will be entered in a drawing. Winner will be notified on Sunday. You get as many entries as you have pennies for the month. Prizes will include books, gift cards, site promotion, and other bookish winnings!
  7. Have fun! This is a fun way to start some discussion, discover blogs, and get to know more people. Please re-post these steps so that followers understand the process.


Congratulations to last month's winner





Fairy tales are more than true; not because they tell us that dragons exist,
but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.
Coraline, by Neil Gaiman

Book Talk: I'm in a mid-series reading slump

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

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Just before Christmas I started reading the Lux Series by Jennifer Armentrout. I cruised through the first two books and fell in love with the characters, plot, writing style, everything. I immediately bought book 3, Opal, and started reading that the day I finished Onyx. Here I am about a month later and I'm still only 20% through Opal...

It's not that it's not as interesting, or well written, or swoon worthy as the others. I just don't feel like reading it. At first I thought it was because I cruised through so many books in a short period of time that I wore myself out. But I'm still reading a lot and enjoying other books. I'm just choosing books that are a little less complex and are stand alones. Maybe I wore myself out in the paranormal/sci-fi genre.

Or maybe I wore myself out with the characters.

Does anyone else experience this about midway through a series? The first book is great because it introduces everything and the second builds on relationships and builds the big scheme. Then usually the third or fourth book is putting in all of the plot twists and sometimes your just over it. You're ready for certain parts to be solved already and different plots to be revealed. I think that's where I'm at. I love the story, but in my mind it has turned monotonous -- even though it's not! It's action packed and full of new!

Hopefully a little break helps. And hopefully I haven't tainted any of my feelings for the series.

How about you? Does your enjoyment of a series ebb and flow sometimes, regardless of how good the book actually is?

Blog Talk: Identifying your audience and making changes to improve your readership

Monday, January 19, 2015

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Graph of most popular countries among blog viewers
Who is reading your blog?
www.thebookcove.com
Who is reading your blog?

Are you aware of your demographics? Who is sharing your posts? What kind of posts are getting the most attention and who is driving that attention?

If you want your blog to continue to progress or move in a certain direction, then these are questions that you must answer at some point. Your generic blog stats on Wordpress or Blogger may not provide accurate or extensive answers to these questions, but there are external sources that you can use to identify these; one being Google Analytics. This isn't meant to be a post on how to monitor blog stats per se so I will not go into detail about the variety of trackers out there. Just know that using one outside of your generic blog stats feature is a good idea.

So back to the question -- who is reading your blog? Does it appeal to a certain age group or -- as the case is for book bloggers -- a subset of bibliophiles? Which social media site is driving the most readers to your site?

A penny for your thoughts #4 (quote from The Fault in Our Stars by John Green)

Sunday, January 18, 2015

| | | 2 comments
Words touch us all in different ways. Sometimes the original intent of a quote resonates so profoundly with us that it is hard to believe that another wrote it. Other times it is a single word, peculiar phrasing, or an alternative meaning regarding an event in our lives that resonates the most. I believe in the power of starting the day (and week) off with a positive thought -- and so was created A Penny For Your Thoughts. This is a weekly blog hop that will feature quotes of all kinds; classics, character, book-movie, personal, etc. The themes will range from funny to serious, but really it all depends on how you interpret it! How does this work?
  1. Every Sunday a quote will be posted
  2. Post your thoughts on your blog and/or the comment section of a participating blog. You only get the penny for one or the other. You can do both but it doesn't count twice.
  3. Those with posts can join up on the Linky - Linky will not be active until day of post
  4. Collect the pennies! Every week there will be a new penny to collect and include with your post.
  5. RAFFLE ENTRY: Your site or comment needs to be submitted to this form as well so that your name can be uploaded to a raffle generator. If you're using a comment as a submission instead of a post, then put name of site where you left the comment in the "direct link" section.
  6. On the last Saturday of every month the entries from the form above will be entered in a drawing. Winner will be notified on Sunday. You get as many entries as you have pennies for the month. Prizes will include books, gift cards, site promotion, and other bookish winnings!
  7. Have fun! This is a fun way to start some discussion, discover blogs, and get to know more people. Please re-post these steps so that followers understand the process.

Some tourists think Amsterdam is a city of sin, but in truth it
is a city of freedom. And in freedom, most people find sin.
- John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

Feature and Follow #24 (Do you collect book copies?)

Saturday, January 17, 2015

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What is Feature and Follow?

F&F is a weekly blog hop that consists of book bloggers. It is hosted byAlison Can Read and Parajunkee. The rules of involvement are simple:

1.) Link up on the blog hop Linky gadget below this post, 2.) follow the hosts via their network of choice, 3.) follow the weekly featured blog(s) via their network of choice (listed as "featured" in the blog list below), and lastly, 4) check out the rest of the blogs on the hop! If you become a new follower of a blog, let them know and they will follow you back.

The F&F is a great way to network, meet other book bloggers, and gain new followers. Even more so, it's a great way to drive fun discussion on a weekly topic.

Book Spotlight: Second Nature (#1 Blood at First Sight Series) by Marie Lavender

Thursday, January 15, 2015

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Second Nature (Book 1 of Blood at First Sight Series)
by Marie Lavender
www.thebookcove.com
(Blurb): She never expected it…

Desiree Edwards has a problem. She’s been attacked, kidnapped and forced to get along with a vampire of all things. It’s something right out of the story books she reads, or her worst nightmare. But, sometimes he’s not the monster he appears to be. He seems so humanlike that she can’t help it when her emotions betray her, when her body betrays her. To make matters worse, she finds out more about herself than she ever wanted to know.

She was unlike any other…

Alec has a problem. The animal in him wants Desiree. But, so does the man. The more he learns about her, the harder it is to deny what he wants. But, he’s a freak, and she’s just a human. The two species don’t mix that way. Then an old enemy surfaces and Alec is forced to make a choice. His life or hers.

Can Alec’s soul be saved by this unique human? Or will it be far too late?


Author Interview: Science Fiction Author Ted Cross

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

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The Immortality Game:
(Blurb): Moscow, 2138. With the world only beginning to recover from the complete societal collapse of the late 21st Century, Zoya scrapes by prepping corpses for funerals and dreams of saving enough money to have a child. When her brother forces her to bring him a mysterious package, she witnesses his murder and finds herself on the run from ruthless mobsters. Frantically trying to stay alive and save her loved ones, Zoya opens the package and discovers two unusual data cards, one that allows her to fight back against the mafia and another which may hold the key to everlasting life.







Book Talk: Creating an effective media kit

Monday, January 12, 2015

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What to include in a book media
kit. www.thebookcove.com
We do a lot of promotions on here. From author interviews to book and author spotlights, cover reveals, giveaways, and more, we've done a bit of everything. We've worked with multiple media outlets, publishers, and marketers. Marketing kits and styles have varied greatly with these experiences, and over time we've been able to figure out what works best on our end -- which usually carries over to the author as well.

Figuring out effective marketing tactics is something that comes with experience -- and perhaps a bit of luck. Sometimes less is more. You don't want to overwhelm a potential buyer by throwing five book trailers, three chapter excerpts, and a bunch of teaser posters all in one sitting. On the other hand, you need to provide enough information to peak interest, generate book clicks, and hopefully positively influence sales.

Please Keep In Mind:

© The Book Cove, 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to The Book Cove with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Book Cove is a private entity independent of the promotions, events, features, authors, programs and so forth that are featured on The Book Cove website or in newsletters. The Book Cove does not guarantee quality or content of those works and events featured. The Book Cove does not assure legality of the works and events featured.

Creative Commons License
Book Cove Reviews by http://www.thebookcove.com is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.